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COMM 319 -- Spring, 2015

GLOBAL JOURNALISM

Thursdays, 6:00 - 8:45 p.m.
118 Knott Academic Center

CIA

Globe
PenSword



The first philosopher | China | Eurojournalism | Exojournalism | SPJ | Links | APA citations | MLA citations | Music to study by | OK, more music | Rules of the air

Different views of the news:  Al Jazeera TV | British Broadcasting Corp TV | Canadian Broadcasting Corp TV | China Central TV | Drudge Report | Russia Today TV

 
U.S. National Debt Clock
Debt
Did you know that a majority of the world's
people live in just seven countries?
Write down what you think they are, then go to
http://www.internetworldstats.com/stats8.htm
Zimbabwe

TEXT:  Arnold S. de Beer, ed.  Global Journalism:  Topical Issues and Media Systems, 5th ed.  Boston:  Pearson, 2009.  (ISBN-13:  978-0-205-60811-9)

«REQUIRED» five-minute video:  Et Plagieringseventyr (press the CC button if English subtitles don't appear)

Recommended movies:  Missing (1982); The Year of Living Dangerously (1982); The Killing Fields (1984); 1984 (1984); Salvador (1986); Kill the Messenger (2014)



Nehru Goebbels Orwell Solzhenitsyn
"Our country!  In her intercourse with foreign nations, may she always be in the right; but our country, right or wrong."
--Stephen Decatur

"Citizenship consists in the service of the country."
--Jawaharlal Nehru

"As long as I live, I will never forget that day 21 years ago when I raised my hand and took the oath of citizenship.  Do you
know how proud I was?  I was so proud that I walked around with an American flag around my shoulders all day long."
--Arnold Schwarzenegger [who remained a dual citizen of Austria]

Volkischer Triumph des Willens Der Angriff "But our citizenship is in heaven . . . ."
--New American Bible Revised Edition, Philippians 3:20a.

"It is the absolute right of the State to supervise the formation of public opinion."
"Think of the press as a great keyboard on which the government can play."
--Paul Joseph Goebbels

"The conscious and intelligent manipulation of the organized habits and opinions of the masses is an important element in democratic society.
Those who manipulate this unseen mechanism of society constitute an invisible government which is the true ruling power of our country."
--Edward Bernays.  Propaganda.  London:  Routledge—Taylor & Francis, 1928.

"[P]olitical speech and writing are largely the defence of the indefensible. . . .
Thus political language has to consist largely of euphemism, question-begging and sheer cloudy vagueness. . . .
Political language . . . is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable, and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind."
--George Orwell.  "Politics and the English Language."  Horizon, April 1946.

"Hastiness and superficiality are the psychic diseases of the twentieth century, and more than anywhere else this disease is reflected in the press.
In-depth analysis of a problem is anathema to the press.  It stops at sensational formulas."
--Alexander Solzhenitsyn.  "A World Split Apart."  An Address at Harvard Class Day Afternoon Exercises, 8 June 1978.

"The TV business is uglier than most things.  It is normally perceived as some kind of cruel and shallow money trench through the heart
of the journalism industry, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free and good men die like dogs, for no good reason."
--Hunter S. Thompson.  Generation of Swine:  Tales of Shame and Degradation in the '80s.  New York:  Summit Books, 1988.

"Americans' confidence in the media's ability to report 'the news fully, accurately, and fairly' has returned to its previous all-time low of 40%."
--Justin McCarthy.  "Trust in Mass Media Returns to All-Time Low."  Gallup Politics, 17 Sept. 2014.


COURSE DESCRIPTION:  An examination of major issues in global communication through the analysis of international news and information flow, social
and economic impacts of communication technologies, disparities in media development, and the interconnectedness of communication and public policy.


Assignments

CLASS:
DATE (2015)

TEXTBOOK READINGS TOPICS OTHER ASSIGNMENTS
#1:
15 January
Pages xv-30
(Preface, About This Book,
Chapter 1, and Chapter 2)
Global Journalism:  Theoretical Perspectives
Introduction to Global Western Journalism Theory
Critical and non-Western Press Philosophies
Read (1) What is it that journalists do?,
(2) The ‘awayness’ problem, and
(3) 12 trends shaping digital news
#2:
22 January
Pages 31-70
(Chapter 3, Chapter 4,
and part of Chapter 5)
Challenges and Barriers to Global Journalism
Global and National News Agencies
Barriers to Media Development
Freedom of the Press around the World
Watch (1) Ned Beatty Network monologue, and
read (2) Who Owns What You Watch On TV?
and (3) State of the News Media 2014
#3:
29 January
Pages 70-105
(remainder of Chapter 5, Chapter 6,
and part of Chapter 7)
Freedom of the Press around the World (continued)
Global Journalism Ethics
Global Advertising and Public Relations
(1) Spend at least an hour exploring Freedom of the Press 2014
and Reporters Without Borders, and
(2) read Global Media Ethics
#4:
5 February
Pages 105-140
(remainder of Chapter 7, Chapter 8,
and part of Chapter 9)
Global Advertising and Public Relations (continued)
Continuing Media Controversies
Global Journalism Education
Watch (1) Edward Bernays and Propaganda 1 of 2
and (2) Edward Bernays and Propaganda 2 of 2, and read
(3) Nigeria and the New World Information and Communication Order
#5:
12 February


2d ½ = Exam #1
Pages 140-161
(remainder of Chapter 9, Chapter 10,
and part of Chapter 11)

PAGES 1-161
Global Journalism Education (continued)
Journalists:  International Profiles
Reporting Foreign Places


. . .
#6:
19 February
Pages 161-199
(remainder of Chapter 11, Chapter 12,
and part of Chapter 13)
Reporting Foreign Places (continued)
Global News—The Fleeting, Elusive but Essential Feature of Global Journalism
Global Journalism in the World's Regions
Western Europe
Spend at least an hour exploring The Guardian (GBR)
and Il Sole 24 Ore (ITA)
Country Reports:  Western Europe
#7:
26 February
Pages 199-232
(remainder of Chapter 13
and part of Chapter 14)
Western Europe (continued)
Eastern Europe, Eurasia, and Russia
Read (1) Milosevic's Propaganda War and
(2) Handmaiden of democracy or everybody's football?,
and spend at least an hour exploring (3) Standart (BGR)
Country Reports:  Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Eurasia and Russia
No Class:
5 March
. . . . . . . . .
#8:
12 March
Pages 233-262
(remainder of Chapter 14
and part of Chapter 15)
Eastern Europe, Eurasia, and Russia (continued)
The Middle East and North Africa
Read (1) Moscow’s New Rules,
(2) Russia’s leap in Internet control,
and (3) Breathing Room
Country Reports:  Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Russia, the Middle East and North Africa
#9:
19 March
Pages 265-304
(remainder of Chapter 15
and part of Chapter 16)
The Middle East and North Africa (continued)
Sub-Saharan Africa
Read (1) Why didn't CNN's international arm air its own documentary on Bahrain's Arab Spring repression?,
(2) Twitter Devolutions (create a free account to access),
and (3) Conflicts in Africa
Country Reports:  The Middle East, North Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa
#10:
26 March

2d ½ = Exam #2
Pages 304-320
(part of Chapter 16)

PAGES 161-320
Sub-Saharan Africa (continued)


Country Reports:  Sub-Saharan Africa


No Class:
2 April
. . . . . . . . .
#11:
9 April
Pages 320-359
(remainder of Chapter 16
and part of Chapter 17)
Sub-Saharan Africa (continued)
Asia and the Pacific
Spend at least an hour exploring countries at Sub-Saharan Africa
and Asia-Pacific
Country Reports:  Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and the Pacific
#12:
16 April
Pages 359-389
(part of Chapter 17)
Asia and the Pacific (continued) Read (1) The long arm of Chinese censorship
and (2) Media Censorship in China
Country Reports:  Asia and the Pacific
#13:
23 April
Pages 389-427
(remainder of Chapter 17, Chapter 18,
and part of Chapter 19)
Asia and the Pacific (continued)
Australasia
Latin America
Spend at least an hour exploring countries at Americas
Country Reports:  Asia, the Pacific, Australasia and Latin America
#14:
30 April
Pages 427-466
(remainder of Chapter 19
and Chapter 20)
Latin America (continued)
North America
(1) Read Our Mandate for Canadian Content and
(2) spend at least an hour watching The Alex Jones Show
Country Reports:  Latin America and North America
#15:
7 May, 7:15 p.m.
FINAL EXAM
PAGES 320-466 . . . UN       Parlamento Mondiale




Student Learning Outcomes
COMM 319 Course Objectives:
By the end of this course, students should be able to

Corresponding Communication Studies Departmental Objectives:
By the end of this course, students should be able to
Corresponding MSM Undergraduate Program Goals:
The University intends the whole of its undergraduate program to enable students to
1. Demonstrate understanding of the role of the media in providing people worldwide with information they need to make decisions about their lives, including the impact of "new media." Understand the rhetorical and historical contexts of communication.
Comprehend and demonstrate in practice the fundamental ethical principles of the communication discipline.
Understand how communication and theories about it have differed over time and place.
Understand the role and impact of media in society.
Understand their own and others' writing practices.
Be computer literate.
Understand, evaluate, and respond appropriately to others' communication.
2. Integrate diverse modes of human inquiry and expression through rigorous study of the Western tradition, including its American expression.
4. Understand the purposes and concepts of at least one major field of study and become proficient in its methodology.
5. See and seek to respond with justice and solidarity to all in the global community, to protect human dignity, to work for peace and freedom, and to respect the integrity of creation.
6. Continue a life of learning, growth in faith and mature spirituality, and service to the common good.
2. Compare and contrast the American journalism model to other world systems within their historical and cultural contexts. Understand the rhetorical and historical contexts of communication.
Understand the role and impact of media in society.
Comprehend and demonstrate in practice the fundamental ethical principles of the communication discipline.
Understand how communication and theories about it have differed over time and place.
1. Understand and articulate the Catholic vision of the human person, particularly as it relates to the nature of the good, the relationship between faith and reason, and the human relationship with God.
2. Integrate diverse modes of human inquiry and expression through rigorous study of the Western tradition, including its American expression.
3. Think and write critically about the role of journalism worldwide and its impact on people's lives. Understand the rhetorical and historical contexts of communication.
Understand the role and impact of media in society.
Understand, evaluate, and respond appropriately to others' communication.
Comprehend and demonstrate in practice the fundamental ethical principles of the communication discipline.
2. Integrate diverse modes of human inquiry and expression through rigorous study of the Western tradition, including its American expression.
3. Master the skills of analysis, interpretation, communication, and problem solving.
5. See and seek to respond with justice and solidarity to all in the global community, to protect human dignity, to work for peace and freedom, and to respect the integrity of creation.
4. Examine and describe media as agents of both good and evil. Understand the rhetorical and historical contexts of communication.
Comprehend and demonstrate in practice the fundamental ethical principles of the communication discipline.
Understand the nature and practice of persuasion.
Understand their own and others' writing practices.
Understand, evaluate, and respond appropriately to others' communication.
1. Understand and articulate the Catholic vision of the human person, particularly as it relates to the nature of the good, the relationship between faith and reason, and the human relationship with God.
5. See and seek to respond with justice and solidarity to all in the global community, to protect human dignity, to work for peace and freedom, and to respect the integrity of creation.
6. Continue a life of learning, growth in faith and mature spirituality, and service to the common good.
5. Use effective expository English (yes, this is an English course). Understand the rhetorical and historical contexts of communication.
Understand the nature and practice of persuasion.
Write for a variety of audiences and situations.
Understand their own and others' writing practices.
Edit writing.
Understand, evaluate, and respond appropriately to others' communication.
Speak well in public.
3. Master the skills of analysis, interpretation, communication, and problem solving.
4. Understand the purposes and concepts of at least one major field of study and become proficient in its methodology.
6. Continue a life of learning, growth in faith and mature spirituality, and service to the common good.




ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:  At Mount St. Mary's University, we believe that an academic community "must operate with complete openness, honesty, and integrity" (2014-15 Undergraduate Catalog, p. 57).  To this end, there are certain activities that our community does not countenance.  These include, but are not limited to the following:
{1}  Cheating, which the University defines as "the unauthorized use or exchange of information before or during a quiz, test, or semester examination" (p. 57).  Also included in this definition are unauthorized collaboration on a class assignment, submitting the same work in two courses without the professor’s permission, buying or selling work for a course, and electronically submitting an intentionally corrupted file.
{2}  Plagiarism, which the University defines as "the representation of words or ideas as one’s own" (p. 57).  Acts that constitute plagiarism include copying homework assignments, submitting papers that someone else has written for you in whole or in part, and failing to cite references properly in your written assignments and oral reports.
{3}  Acting in cooperation with another in an act of academic misconduct (p. 57).  The University regards these students as guilty as the person who commits the offense.
Anyone found to be engaging in these activities will receive a failing grade for the assignment and/or the course and will be reported to Dr. Joshua Hochschild, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts.  Please refer to pages 57 through 58 of the Undergraduate Catalog for further information.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students should complete all textbook and online readings by the dates indicated in the left-hand column of the above Assignment grid.
There will be three exams.  Each will cover the pages indicated in the textbook as well as Other Assignments, students' Oral Country Reports, and classroom lectures and discussion.
In addition every student will be assigned a Written and Oral Country Report.  The Written Country Report will be graded 50% on substance and 50% on English.  The Oral Country Report will be graded 50% on substance and 50% on communication skills (see details below).
The first 2.5 absences from class are excused, regardless of the reason (unless you miss an examination or your own Oral Country Report).
  ALL cuts beyond the first 2.5 are UNexcused REGARDLESS OF THE REASON and will result in a reduction of the grade for the course.  Arriving late or leaving early will be counted as a partial cut.
Make-up exams are allowed only in cases of the most extreme emergency and ordinarily must be arranged and taken BEFORE the scheduled date.
The instructor reserves the right to alter course content or adjust the pace of class and assignments in order to accommodate class projects.

GRADING:  Components will be weighted as follows:  Exam #1, 20%; Exam #2, 20%; Final Exam, 20%; Written Country Report, 15%; Oral Country Report, 15%; and Class Preparation and Participation, 10%.  Normative standards are 96-100% = A; 91-95% = A-; 86-90% = B+; 81-85 = B; 76-80% = B-; 71-75% = C+; 66-70% = C; 61-65% = C-; 56-60% = D+; 51-55% = D; 46-50% = D-; 0-45% = F.  The instructor reserves the right to curve the grades if he feels that doing so would more accurately reflect the quality of the class's work.

COUNTRY REPORTS--Here's What You Do:
{1}  Pick a country that you have never been to (we will discuss in class what a "country" is).  Begin by clicking on the flags at the top of this syllabus to read about countries that you're interested in.  No two students can report on the same country, so the first one to e-mail the instructor with his/her selection wins the race.  If a student has not picked a country by the second class meeting, the instructor will assign a country to him or her.
{2}  Start your research at http://libguides.msmary.edu/BeginDiscovery.  Most of the print materials you'll be looking for will be found in the Phillips Library catalogued at AI, AN, AP, PN4699 to PN5650, and Z657 to Z659.  Here is a sampling of online articles and books that may prove useful:  Children's issues, Ethical issues, First Amendment timeline, Media and the Rwanda Genocide, New World Information and Communication Order #1, NWICO #2, NWICO #3, Role of Mass Media in Transitions to Democracy, and Russia profile.
{3}  Write a report on journalism in, from, to, and affecting your country.  Be sure to mention what media predominate, who owns and who controls those media, what the content of the news is, what effect it has on society, and the extent to which journalists uphold evolving concepts of global journalism ethics.  You must use at least five reliable online sources and at least five reliable print sources, including your textbook (note that Wikipedia is not considered a reliable source and may not be quoted or cited in your paper).  The paper should be DOUBLE-SPACED, at least 1,000 words and no more than 2,000 words.  Follow all rules contained in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association or the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (pick one or the other; don't mix-and-match), with one exception:  sentences should be separated by TWO SPACES, not one.
{4}  Prepare an oral report to teach the class about your chosen country.  Use index cards only.  Do not read your paper!  This is boring.  Written and Oral Reports are due on the date indicated without exception.  If you are absent on the date indicated, you will receive a "0" for the Oral Report.  Even so, at least be sure to turn in your Written Report on time; one letter grade is deducted for each day that it is late.

STATEMENT ON DISABILITY:  Mount St. Mary's University welcomes otherwise-qualified students with disabilities to participate in all of its courses, programs, and activities.  In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1973, all students with documented disabilities will be provided reasonable accommodation in this course.  If you have a documented disability and require accommodations to access course material, activities, or requirements, you must (1) speak with Denise Marjarum, Director of Learning Services, by phone at (301) 447-5132 or to visit her personally on the first floor of Borders Hall, and (2) meet with me, the instructor, within two weeks of receiving a copy of the accommodation letter from Learning Services to discuss your accommodation needs and their implementation.




Ethiopia ArmsThe Count of Shoa The instructor for this course is Dr. William Martin Sloane,
an Anglican bishop and a Maryland/Pennsylvania attorney.
Articles:  http://www.examiner.com/law-and-politics-1-in-harrisburg/dr-william-martin-sloane.
Bio:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/wmsloane.
        Students are welcome to contact him at
          any time with questions or problems.

  Office:  212 Knott Academic Center
  Hours:  Before and after class and by appointment
  E:  [email protected], [email protected]
  Phone:  (717) 249-1069
  1st BirthdayGeorge



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